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1962 Chevrolet Impala SS Found in a Milk Barn Full of Cars Hides One Big Secret

In terms of styling, the 1962 Impala brought few changes as compared to its predecessors, though the most notable upgrade was, without a doubt, the debut of the convertible-style roof.
1962 Impala SS 25 photos
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With a special C-pillar design, the new Impala, therefore, received a sportier attitude, and it goes without saying this new approach fitted the SS model like a glove.

As far as the engines go, however, the model year 1962 brought lots of changes. First, Chevrolet dropped the more powerful versions of the base V8 and introduced the all-new 327 (5.3-liter) small-block available with either 250 or 300-horsepower options.

Furthermore, the legendary 348 (5.7-liter) was finally dropped, with the GM brand now going all-in on the 409 (6.7-liter) big-block developing either 380 or 409 horsepower.

The engine under the hood is precisely the most mysterious bit of this 1962 Impala SS.

Recently discovered in a milk barn where it’s been stored alongside a pack of other classic cars, this Chevy appears to be powered by a 283 (4.7-liter), or at least, that’s what the owner believes it is. There’s no stamp on the engine, so at first glance, it’s no longer the original unit.

eBay seller mikenteri says the V8 was no longer running when they bought the car, but after a series of fixes, including a new water pump, a new radiator, and so on, it ended up running just fine. Furthermore, it appears the engine has already been rebuilt at some point during its life, so without a doubt, this is one of the parts that require further investigation before committing to a purchase.

Otherwise, the car looks very intriguing and very doable. The body seems solid, except for the typical spots that are invaded by rust. There’s some primer on the body as well, and we’re being told the outside rust is just on the surface.

The selling price appears to be a major roadblock for this Impala’s ambition of rebecoming a daily driver, as the owner expects to get some $13,500 for it.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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