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1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder Is an Unexpected Barn Find Saved After Many Years of Sitting

As far as Chevrolet’s sales are concerned, the first half of the ‘60s was dominated by the Impala and its always-increasing number of customers.
1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder 12 photos
1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder1962 Chevrolet Corvair Spyder
However, the GM brand’s portfolio included a long list of other models that weren’t necessarily as successful as the Impala or the Chevelle but still ended up building a solid customer base in the United States.

The Corvair is just the living proof. The model year 1962, for instance, came with a series of very important changes, especially as Chevrolet was still searching for the right recipe to increase its customer appeal.

A convertible version was finally introduced in the summer of ’62, but on the other hand, what is considered by many the most notable upgrade was the debut of the Spyder version. The car was fitted with a turbocharged engine (available on the Monza coupe and convertibles), with the power output increased to 125 horsepower.

And here’s where the fun part begins.

Someone on Craigslist is selling one of these Spyders, and according to their post, it’s a barn find that has been collecting dust for many years. Needless to say, it does require an overhaul, but the seller promises there’s no bad rust.

On the other hand, the good part is what’s under the hood. The Corvair still flexes the original turbo engine, and at first glance, it still turns over.

At the same time, everything is still there, so the car is as complete as possible. This is good news for anyone planning a full restoration, though it also depends on the condition of these parts.

At the end of the day, this Corvair looks like a very intriguing restoration candidate, and given its price, it could end up becoming a very solid father-son project. The seller is willing to let the car go for no more, no less than $1,800.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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