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1960 Plymouth Fury Lives Up to Its Angry Name, Packs the Right Cross-Ram V8

Do you happen to have some $110k sitting around doing nothing? If so, and you love cars, this 1960 Plymouth Fury might be the right thing to blow it all on.
1960 Plymouth Fury 18 photos
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For us modern humans, the name Plymouth when used for cars no longer means that much. The brand was born in the late 1920s as an offshoot of Chrysler and it was originally meant as a low-priced offer to compete with the likes of Ford and Chevy. Which is kind of ironic, considering the fortunes some Plymouths currently go for.

These high-valued cars come from the 1960s and 1970s, when the nameplate got the recipe right and produced things like the Barracuda, or the Fury. The later Plymouth cars, like the Prowler or Neon, were partially responsible for Chrysler killing the brand in 2001.

Back to this here Fury, what you see in the gallery above is one of the finest examples we’ve dug up all year. And it’s recent too, as a ground-up restoration was completed in 2020, trying to keep as close to the original design as possible.

Wrapped in Jet Black and Oyster White on the outside and boasting a black and silver vinyl interior, the angry-looking blast from motoring history’s glorious past is powered by an era-correct 383ci (6.3-liter) Golden Commando V8 – the name given by Plymouth to Chrysler’s B engine – with dual-quad cross-ram induction, linked to an equally era-correct 3-speed automatic transmission with pushbutton controls.

As said, the car is for sale, and the dealer doing that is asking exactly $109,900 for it, a price that not only seems right for the car, but also includes many of the expenses of the work done on it – the steering wheel alone for instance, also a period-correct one, cost $2,500 to remake.

The seller throws in for good measure photos and receipts of the restoration work, as well as the promise of shipping “your new classic anywhere in the world.”

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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