autoevolution
Car video reviews:
 

1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe Features Numbers-Matching Everything, Isn’t Cheap

Produced between 1952 and 1964, the 250 is – without a shadow of a doubt – the most collectible series in the Prancing Horse’s long and illustrious history. Although we all dream of driving a GTO or a California Spyder, the Pinin Farina Coupe holds a special place in the 250 family.
1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe 20 photos
1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe1960 Ferrari 250 GT Pinin Farina Coupe
Presented in 1958 at the Salon de Paris, the Pinin Farina-bodied model is the first series-production Ferrari ever. This fellow replaced the superb 250 Europa, also dressed by Battista Pinin Farina’s coachbuilding company.

Through 1960, a little over 350 units were produced. Chassis number 1971GT is the 338th of 353 examples ever made, a gorgeous blast from the past with numbers-matching everything. Finished in Blu Sera MM 16439 paintwork and Beige VM 3097 Connolly leather for the interior, the 2+2 grand tourer is a 2+2 in name only, because the rear seats provide almost no legroom.

Delivered new to Garage Francorchamps in Brussels, the stunningly elegant Pinin Farina Coupe was then sold to somebody in the United States through Luigi Chinetti Motors. Come 1973, it found a new home in Northern California in the hands of a gentleman who enjoyed it for 48 years. The selling dealer purchased the vehicle in 2021, and the compression test of the Colombo-series 3.0L V12 engine shows that it’s a healthy powerplant.

This variant of the Colombo, dubbed 128F, features spark plugs on the outside of each cylinder bank. Rebuilt by Automobili Scuderia between 1990 and 1991 with oversized pistons, rings, and bearings, the free-breathing mill uses twin-choke Weber carbs, rebuilt by the dealer last year.

The Houdaille shock absorbers were rebuilt back then as well, and the calipers are said to have been rebuilt in 2015. Presented with Michelin X tires wrapped around chromed Borrani wire wheels refurbished in 1990, the highly collectible Fezza is currently rocking $235k after five expressions of interest on Bring a Trailer. The auction ends in five days on June 29th.



Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

Would you like AUTOEVOLUTION to send you notifications?

You will only receive our top stories