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1959 Chevrolet Impala Convertible Gets Obvious Engine Upgrade, Incredibly Expensive

The Chevrolet Impala got to see the daylight in 1958 when the GM brand introduced this model as the top-of-the-line Bel Air.
1959 Chevrolet Impala 25 photos
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The early success of the Impala, however, rapidly convinced Chevrolet to promote this nameplate to a stand-alone series. Just one year later, the Bel Air and the Impala embraced separate paths, though they continued to share most of the parts, engines, and looks.

The 1959 Impala is therefore the first model that tried to make a name for itself on its own, and needless to say, it’s one of the most sought-after classic cars today.

Someone on eBay claims they have an original 1959 Impala, yet the car has already received a series of changes that pushes it closer to restomod territory rather than to a time capsule status.

First and foremost, let’s start with what brought you here: the engine. This Impala rolled off the assembly lines with a six-cylinder unit under the hood, but that engine is long gone now. The owner upgraded the car to a 283 (4.7-liter) V8 that still starts and runs properly.

For many people out there, a six-cylinder Impala didn’t make much sense, especially when it left the factory with SS tags (for what it’s worth, the SS could be fitted with both V8s and six-cylinders for some model years, despite the latter not necessarily matching its performance-oriented approach).

This is why a V8 Impala typically costs a lot more, though the final price also depends on a series of other factors as well, including how original and complete the car continues to be.

Getting back to this 1959 model, it also comes with a 1964 Impala SS center console and bucket seats, aftermarket air conditioning, and so on. The paint looks really good, but some occasional dents and scratches can still be spotted here and there.

eBay seller zakoboy86 hasn’t said anything about a potential restoration this Impala may have been a part of, so we assume most of the car continues to be original and unmolested.

But what truly sets it apart from the rest of the crowd is the selling price. Despite the occasional issues, the engine swap, the crack on the windshield, and the ripped back seat, the owner hopes they could fetch no more, no less than $142,500 for this Impala at the time of writing.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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