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1955 Ford Thunderbird Parked for 52 Years Is a Mysterious Barn Find

A car sitting for 50 years is usually doomed to rot away beyond recognition, but that's not always the case. If stored properly, it can come back into the light as a solid survivor. This 1955 Ford Thunderbird appears to be one of those cars.
1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find 13 photos
1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find1955 Ford Thunderbird barn find
A first-year edition of the iconic drop-top described as a "personal luxury car," this Thunderbird was parked back in 1970. Having spent 15 years on the road, the two-seater remained in storage for a whopping 52 years.

Dragged out of its resting place for what appears to be an estate sale, the Thunderbird is in surprisingly good condition. For a classic that's been locked away for so many decades, that is! Unfortunately, there's no info as to why it was parked such a long time ago.

The original Torch Red has a nice patina to it, and all the chrome trim is in place (and looking fine). What's more, it comes with both tops, including the matching Torch Red fiberglass roof you see here.

On the flip side, the low-resolution pictures prevent us from getting a closer look at the car. And while the two-tone interior appears to be nice overall, it may hide some issues that aren't mentioned in the ad. But the car seems complete both inside and out.

The T-Bird is obviously fitted with a 292-cubic-inch (4.8-liter) Y-block V8, the only engine available in 1955 (Ford added an optional 312-cubic-inch / 5.1-liter mill in 1956). The ad says the unit is paired to an automatic gearbox, which should be the three-speed Fordomatic.

There's no info on whether the Y-block runs or not, but it's safe to assume that it doesn't after all these years. Still, it appears to be complete, and it could very well be the car's numbers-matching powerplant. With 70,000 miles (112,654 km) on the clock, this Thunderbird is also a relatively low-mileage classic.

All told, the T-Bird appears to be a fine survivor that's definitely worth restoring. On the other hand, the lack of high-res photos keeps this convertible a mystery and makes bidding on it a bit risky. If you're willing to take a shot, though, the auction is set to go live on July 9. The car is located in Marion, Indiana.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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