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1950 Vought Corsair Is the Last Surviving Korean War Flying Nightmare

Back in the early 1940s, factories on most of the world’s continents were busy churning out war machines to aid in the global conflict that had just started. That era was one of incredibly fast advancements for a number of industries, including aviation.
1950 Vought Corsair 8 photos
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The Chance Vought F4U Corsair is one of the products of that time. In the skies over the Pacific since 1942, the warbird was designed primarily as a carrier-based aircraft, and during its engagements with the Japanese, the plane managed to score a kill ratio of 11 to 1.

The plane remained in production well after the end of the war, until 1953. During its life span, a little over 12,000 were made in a great deal of variants, and served a number of countries, from the U.S. to France and several countries in South America.

The one-man fighter reached speeds of 446 mph (717 kph), had a range of 328 mi (528 km), and was armed with M2 Browning machine guns, rockets, and bombs.

After successfully serving in the Second World War, the Corsair was dispatched over Korea. The one we have here, made in 1950, is of the F4U-5NL variety, and served with the Marine Attack Squadron 513 (VFM-513) under the U.S. 5th Air Force.

The squadron became known as the Flying Nightmares and operated Corsairs, Grumman F7F Tigercats, and later on even jet-powered Douglas F3D Skyknights. During its time over Korea, the unit flew 2,086 hours in 604 combat sorties, most of them at night.

The Flying Nightmares had 15 Corsairs in their arsenal, and it is believed this is the last surviving one. After taking part in the Korean War, it was deployed by the Argentine Navy’s 2nd Attack Squadron, and on the aircraft carrier Independencia. Back in 2010, it made its way back in Europe, where it flew constantly starting 2010.

Presently the last of the Corsair Flying Nightmares is for sale in Germany, with an asking price of $3.375 million.

 
 
 
 
 

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