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1930 Ford Model A ‘Durty 30’ Is a Rolling Piece of Art

It’s not every day that we get to feast our eyes on a custom build so unique, but this one-of-a-kind mix of Ford, Chevrolet and Hudson parts is simply breathtaking.
1930 Ford Model A Durty 30 28 photos
Photo: Barrett-Jackson
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Nicknamed the ‘Durty 30,’ this custom Ford Model A Roadster has been through at least four different iterations until it reached its current level of stardom, with the first version having been in the spotlights at SEMA 2016.

The car was originally built by a father and son duo named Graham and Joel Cannon, who operate a body shop called Collision Solutions in Okotoks, Alberta, Canada.

Believe it or not, the car was supposed to become a rat rod initially, but over time the project evolved into this clean but ‘durty’ showstopper that it is today.

The base body came from a junkyard Ford Model A, the hood is from a ‘40 Chevrolet, while the grille is from a ‘38 Hudson.

Underneath that long hood lurks a 6.0-liter LS2 all-aluminum V8 from a Corvette, with the builders also adding a Vortect centrifugal supercharger, a Callies crankshaft, K1 pistons and a custom blower cam. The resulting output is a whopping 585 rear-wheel horsepower.

1930 Ford Model A Durty 30
Photo: Barrett-Jackson
The mill has also been fitted with a bespoke billet alternator mount with CNC-machined heads, a custom air-to-water intercooler, a black powder-coated aluminum radiator, custom headers, fuel tanks and a ceramic-coated 3-inch exhaust system with Borla mufflers tucked neatly into the frame.

Apparently, every single nut and bolt is either dry-filmed, made from ARP stainless steel or polished. Sending all that power to the rear wheels is a 6L80 automatic transmission with a stall converter, paired with a Ford 8.8-inch rear end with Auburn pos-traction and an aluminum driveshaft.

The Durty 30 can stop just fine thanks to a set of Wilwood disc brakes with 13-inch rotors and 6-piston calipers, which sit neatly inside bespoke 24-inch Kompression wheels at the rear and 24-inch at the rear. They are wrapped with Pirelli tires that measure 255/30 R21 at the front and a massive 405/25 R24 at the rear.

1930 Ford Model A Durty 30
Photo: Barrett-Jackson
The original Model A body has been widened no less than 8 inches and has also been stretched a further 6 inches, while custom LED headlights and turn signals were built into a billet cross member.

Most of the body is finished in a custom-bended Glasurit black paint with copper and gold flakes and Orange Candy, topped with no less than eight coats of clearcoat.

Inside, the two passengers are treated to a couple of floating seats that include real copper, painted aluminum, suede inserts and a triple-layered polishes stainless steel parts, which kind of make the interior look like it’s from a steampunk comic book.

1930 Ford Model A Durty 30
Photo: Barrett-Jackson
The Racepak dash also has stainless steel and ebony inserts while the floor is ebony hardwood. The center console is from a 2011 Cadillac CTS-V, featuring a start button for the Chevy beast under the hood, while the signal light switch is hidden in the shifter boot. In the middle you can also find an actual iPad, while the custom rearview mirror mount is made from solid copper as well.

Last but certainly not least, the dashboard includes none other than Chip Foose’s signature, and the two-seat interior can be hidden from prying eyes with the help of a custom top engulfed in ostrich leather.

We don’t know about you, but we think the end result is definitely a lot more attention-grabbing than any rat rod out there, so we’re pretty glad that the original idea to keep all the rusted body parts was scrapped.

No word on an estimate for how much this will fetch but you might want to keep in mind that the Durty 30 is going under the hammer at the Scottsdale - March 2021 auction by Barrett-Jackson.
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About the author: Alex Oagana
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Alex handled his first real steering wheel at the age of five (on a field) and started practicing "Scandinavian Flicks" at 14 (on non-public gravel roads). Following his time at the University of Journalism, he landed his first real job at the local franchise of Top Gear magazine a few years before Mircea (Panait). Not long after, Alex entered the New Media realm with the autoevolution.com project.
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