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1929 Ford Model A Street Rod Is the One That Got Away

Present-day Ford pickup trucks are leaders of the segment, and have been so for quite some time now. The competition is catching up, sure, but the Blue Oval doesn’t seem to be able and willing to let the throne slip away without a fight. After all, it has been making pickups for over 103 years.
1929 Ford Model A Street Rod 16 photos
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It was in 1917 when the carmaker saw the Model T’s potential to cater to other needs than just passenger transportation and gave birth to the TT. It was a strange machine that came only as a chassis and had to be complete with the buyer-supplied body – factory-bodied TTs wouldn’t be made until the mid-1920s.

It was a long road to get from the three units of the TT sold in 1917 to the nearly 1 million F-Series in 2019, but Ford did it. In between the two, countless models came and went, but never a Model A pickup looking like this.

What you’re seeing is a street rod pickup based on the line of cars the Blue Oval made from 1928 to 1931, and it just got sold for an undisclosed price. Don’t expect it to have been cheap, though, as projects such as this never are.

The build embraces the usual street rod approach, with the 327-ci (5.3-liter) V8 of GM making exposed as it sits sandwiched between the radiator and front end of the cabin. Unlike the engine, the modern and heated seats inside are surrounded by the steel of the doors on the sides, and a convertible top above. There are just two seats in there, as the cabin ends abruptly to make room for the wood bed at the rear.

We have no idea who purchased the street rod, but there are only two possible outcomes for it: we’ll either get to see it at next year’s shows and on the road, or it’ll pop up for sale again, as these builds usually do.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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