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$17 Million 1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato Goes to Auction

Back in the 1960s, Aston Martin and Ferrari were in a big race to take the podium, literally. The British sportscar maker introduced the DB4GT as a direct competitor to the Ferrari 250 SWB Berlinetta. It wasn’t good enough, though, so it turned to the renowned Italian coachbuilder Zagato. The beauty in question here is one of the 19 units they produced together.
1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato 18 photos
1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato1962 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato
Looking for help outside its headquarters turned out to be a marvelous idea, as the DB4GT is arguably Zagato’s finest creation. A true work of art, it boasts a slightly elongated nose with a more pronounced grille.

In the back, the taillights were set into the fenders, and the C-pillar was reduced by featuring a larger rear windshield. Zagato offered a more voluptuous appeal to the Aston Martin, smoothing out the harder edges in favor of a more dynamic and fluid shape.

It was all about racing, which is why the Italian coachbuilder also reduced nearly 50 kilograms of weight and added 12 horsepower to the total output. It proved to be quite effective too, as this particular unit has performed outstandingly well ever since it was completed in December 1961.

Initially ordered by a businessman from Australia with a passion for racing, it went on and off the continent eventually returning to its native land, in the UK. In 1993, the car was still “in service” even though it had been stored for over 20 years before that. It kept racing like a champ.

It was only in the early 2000s, that the car went through complete restoration, with Aston Martin specialist Richard S. Williams in England and Carrozzeria Zagat’s own facilities in Italy taking good care of it.

According to RM Auctions, which is taking care of the vehicle’s auction in December, the process took two years from disassembly to completion. Although original metal was used wherever possible, Zagato’s own craftsman fabricated new panels, using the original bucks, when necessary.

Moreover, Williams completely rebuilt the vehicle’s mechanical components, including the engine, suspension, and brakes, and was also commissioned to fully restore the interior, as well as complete final assembly when the bodywork returned from Italy. In 2002, the car would once again return to the track, marking a record of accolades in most of the competitions it participated in.

The one of only 19 ever produced is going under the hammer on December 10, and it’s expected to fetch somewhere between $15 to $17 million.



 
 
 
 
 

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