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1,600-Mile 2017 MV Agusta Brutale 800 Prepares to Leave Its First Owner’s Possession

You can be sure a motorcycle means business when its name literally translates to “brutal.”
2017 MV Agusta Brutale 800 23 photos
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It should go without saying that MV Agusta’s Brutale lineup offers some of the sexiest naked bikes around, but you’ll have to part ways with quite a bit of cash if you want to see one parked in your garage. Still, those entities are – for the most part – way more accessible than other MVs, so mere mortals like you and I might actually get to enjoy their companionship someday!

On that note, we have the pleasure of introducing you to a spotless 2017 MY Brutale 800 with just over 1,600 miles (2,600 km) under its belt. The bike features an assortment of carbon fiber bodywork accessories, as well as a curvy SC-Project exhaust with three-into-one headers. Otherwise, its stock configuration remains pretty much unchanged.

What powers Agusta’s predator is a liquid-cooled 798cc inline-three engine with 12.3:1 compression and twelve valves operated by dual cams. The mill can deliver up to 109 feral stallions at 11,500 rpm, along with a peak torque output of 61 pound-feet (83 Nm) at 7,600 whirls per minute. In order to reach the rear wheel, this force goes through a six-speed gearbox that boasts a bi-directional quickshifter.

Tipping the scales at 386 pounds (175 kg) on an empty stomach, the Brutale 800 is able to achieve a top speed of 147 mph (237 kph). Its suspension arrangement comprises upside-down 43 mm (1.7-inch) Marzocchi forks and a progressive Sachs monoshock with preload, rebound, and compression adjustability.

Ample stopping power is made possible by dual 320 mm (12.6-inch) floating discs at the front and a single 220 mm (8.7-inch) unit at the rear, all of which are mated to Brembo calipers. This three-cylinder stunner is hoping to find a new home on Iconic Motorbike Auctions, but the current bid of $2,222 won’t be meeting the reserve. In case you’re feeling more generous, feel free to make an offer by September 30, as that’s when the bidding process will end.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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