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$1.3 Million Vintage Aircraft A-4C Skyhawk Can Make You Feel Like a Navy Pilot

If you thought that vintage military aircraft, also known as warbirds, could only be admired at airshows or museums, you’ll be happy to know that you could become the proud owner of one of these aircraft yourself. And it wouldn’t be just a piece of history you keep on display, but a reliable flight companion that can hold its own against fancier private jets.
This 1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk features the Argentinian Navy markings. 17 photos
1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk1960 Douglas A-4C Skyhawk
Just like some petrolheads will forever stay loyal to ICE vehicles, no matter how alluring EVs may sound, people who know a thing or two about aviation wouldn’t give away a vintage military airplane for a contemporary business jet or, even worse, an eVTOL (electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft).

Luckily, warbird enthusiasts can get their hands on perfectly functional aircraft that had served in the Army decades ago - some of them quite rare, all of them with a fascinating history. This 1960 A-4C Skyhawk, listed for sale via Controller, is a fine example of that. One of the U.S. Navy’s best aircraft, it was innovative at the time of its built, due to the significantly reduced weight.

During the 1950s, Douglas Aircraft Company’s designer, Ed Heinemann, noticed the increasing cost and weight of combat aircraft, so he developed the A-4 with a small delta wing, fewer cockpit components and other modifications that made it much lighter than standard airplanes.

Dubbed the “Tinker Toy” by the pilots, Skyhawk not only reached a world speed record of 695 mph (1,118 kph) over a 310 miles (500 km) course in 1959, but also conducted more combat missions than any other naval aircraft during the Vietnam War.

If you’ve got $1.3 million laying around, you could find out what it’s like to fly an A-4C Skyhawk. This one apparently underwent a serious upgrade, and what stands out about it are the Argentinian Navy markings – several versions of the Skyhawk were delivered to foreign air forces, including Israel and Argentina. Equipped with Collins and Garmin avionics, the A-4C can reach a top speed of 670 mph (1,078 kph) at sea level, and boasts a 2,525-mile (4,060 km) range.

Production ceased in 1979, and the Navy retired its last Douglas A-45 in 2003. So, if you always dreamt of flying a rare naval aircraft, this Tinker Toy looks like an interesting option.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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