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12K-Mile 1997 Honda CBR900RR Holds More Nostalgia-Rousing Flair Than a VHS Tape

With its sturdy running gear and 450-pound curb weight, this bad boy lets you tackle the twisties in style.
1997 Honda CBR900RR 30 photos
1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR1997 Honda CBR900RR
Although this 1997 Honda CBR900RR may show some tiny cosmetic blemishes here and there, its overall condition is still top-notch after 25 years of devoted service. The creature’s six-digit odometer reads less than 12k miles (19,000 km), and its four-cylinder powerplant exhales through a stainless-steel slip-on muffler from Yoshimura’s inventory.

Up front, we find a tinted windshield that’s been fitted under previous ownership, while the electrical components are powered by a high-grade Yuasa battery. To keep things running smoothly for many miles to come, Honda’s rocket saw its constant-velocity Keihin carbs resynchronized and motor oil flushed a few months back.

The mighty CBR comes to life thanks to a liquid-cooled 919cc inline-four mill that’s paired with a wet multi-plate clutch and a six-speed transmission. Featuring dual overhead cams, four valves per cylinder, and a compression ratio of 11.1:1, the engine is capable of generating 128 untamed horses at 10,500 revs.

Around the 8,500-rpm mark, a respectable torque output figure of 68 pound-feet (92 Nm) will be summoned at the crankshaft. Upon reaching the rear wheel, this force can translate to a quarter-mile time of 10.8 seconds and speeds of up to 160 mph (257 kph). Now then, let’s take a quick look at the bike’s chassis configuration before we get to the point.

An aluminum twin-spar frame is responsible for holding everything where it belongs, and suspension duties are handled by 45 mm (1.8 inches) Showa forks and a single remote-reservoir shock absorber. At the front end, braking comes from Nissin calipers and twin rotors measuring 296 mm (1.7 inches) in diameter.

Down south, stopping power is the product of a drilled 220 mm (8.7 inches) brake disc that’s bitten by a single-piston caliper. This ‘97 MY samurai is heading to auction at no reserve on Bring a Trailer, where it will remain listed until tomorrow afternoon (May 18). For the time being, the highest bid is placed at a mere five grand, so you might just be able to secure a genuine bargain!

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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