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1200 HP Custom Lamborghini Beats Aventador SVJ Nürburgring Record by 15 Seconds

It's crazy to think that no road-legal car was able to go under the seven-minute mark before the Porsche 918 Spyder tried its hand seven years ago, but then again the manufacturers weren't so hell-bent on proving their vehicles on the Green Hell back then either.
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These days, though, the cars with the quickest times for either (or both) the 0-60 mph sprint or a full Nordschleife lap have all the bragging rights. Right now, as far as road-going cars are concerned, the latter belong to the Lamborghini Aventador SVJ, the most extreme version of the well-known Italian supercar that has a 6.5-liter V12 engine with 770 horsepower.

Impressive, yes, but falling well short of what the Norwegians at Zyrus Engineering managed to squeeze out of a Lamborghini Huracan Super Trofeo EVO - and, according to the team, even more performance can (and will) be obtained from the car. For now, just remember this number: 1,200.

Of course, the Huracan Super Trofeo EVO is not road legal, which means unless a series of modifications are made, any other car based on the Italian model is going to be constrained to track-only use as well. However, even though the car used by Zyrus Engineering for the Nürburgring run doesn't meet the necessary criteria for registration, the company says 12 of the total 24 vehicles it will make are going to be just as fast while also completely road legal.

Stock, the Huracan Super Trofeo EVO uses a 620 horsepower 5.2-liter V10 engine with a six-gear sequential gearbox sending all power to the rear wheels. Zyrus Engineering installed a "unique" twin-turbo kit that, together with new intake manifolds, a titanium exhaust system, and proprietary electronics, give the car an impressive maximum power of 1,200 hp. The team says it'll offer 1,600 and 2,000 hp versions for its track-only models as well, though the road-going one will be restricted to 1,200 hp.

The weight of a stock Lamborghini Huracan Super Trofeo EVO is 1,270 kg, which makes the 70 kg savings (for that fatidic 1,200 value) brought by Zyrus Engineering seem insignificant. However, considering it was done while also boosting the vehicle's power output (by almost 100 percent) as well as its downforce (more on that later) on a car that's already considered pretty lightweight, it suddenly begins to sound a lot more impressive.

Speaking of downforce - yes, you guessed it: the 1,200 number makes a comeback. Again, we're talking kilograms, which means that using the metric system, the Zyrus LP1200 has a power-to-weight-to-downforce ratio of 1:1:1. That is unless you choose the more potent options, in which case the power begins to overwhelm the other stats.

All this considered, the fact the Zyrus LP1200 was able to lap the Nürburgring in 6:29 doesn't come as much of a surprise. The team's first attempt almost ended in disaster when one of the car's tires blew up at almost 200 km/h (124 mph), but the driver (Fredrik Sørlie) managed to bring the Zyrus LP1200 to a halt safely. You can watch the record-setting clip below as well as the failed attempt.





 
 
 
 
 

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