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1-of-3 1968 Shelby GT500 EFI Prototypes Surfaces, Used to Test Fuel-Injected 428

It would seem like every single Shelby-handled car out there has a story to tell, a uniqueness that helps keep them at the top of the list of the most cherished and desirable automobiles ever made. But even among Shelbys, some are more special than others.
1968 Shelby GT500 EFI Conelec 428 Cobra Jet 15 photos
1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet1968 Shelby GT500 Conelec EFI 428 Cobra Jet
For all intents and purposes, a Shelby does not get more special than the one we have here. A 1968 GT500 by trade, it was instrumental in the development of the Shelby 428 Cobra Jet, the looks of the King of the Road, and possibly more.

You’re looking at the Shelby Mustang GT500 serial number 101, one of three to have been used by Shelby engineers to test fuel injection. In this particular case, the hardware chosen was David Long’s Conelec multi-port-style hardware, and fitted on the GT500 by Shelby’s Fred Goodell.

This particular car is one of just two Conelec fuel-injection Shelbys that are still around and running (we’re told the other one is the famed Green Hornet), and the only one to come in fastback guise. Most importantly, it was used by Shelby to test the Conelec fuel injection system on the 428 Cobra Jet engine.

Aside from these mechanical bits, it is believed this particular Mustang has also been a testbed for multiple body parts used on later Shelbys, including the Ram Air hood deployed on later King of the Road models.

The car is presently listed as part of the Barrett-Jackson auction in Scottsdale, Arizona, scheduled for later this month. It is going with no reserve, but it will probably sell for a fortune.

The reason for that is not its rarity alone, but also the fact it has been the subject of a very well documented, five-year-long restoration process at the hands of Pete Disher. If you haven't heard of him, he's a Shelby pre-production cars expert and Head Judge for 1968 models at the Shelby American Automobile Club (SAAC).

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third-party.

 
 
 
 
 

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