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1-of-2 1961 Chevrolet Impala Is Literally a Piece of GM History, Flexes Top V8 Muscle

The production of the Impala was already on the rise in 1961, with the new nameplate introduced by Chevy in 1958 rapidly gaining popularity.
1961 Chevrolet Impala 18 photos
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Some of the Impalas produced by the GM brand, however, ended up being exported to Canada, though it goes without saying the U.S. market remained the company’s main focus.

Enter this super-rare Canadian 1961 Impala convertible.

First and foremost, the numbers. The owner of the car explains on Craigslist that this Impala is one of just two that are still known to be alive today. This is because the number of Impala convertibles fitted with the top engine and exported to Canada was rather small in the first place.

It’s believed only a little over 80 Impala convertibles fitted with the 348 (5.7-liter) V8 made their way to Canada. Worth knowing is that the 348 was the top V8 option on the Canadian Impala, as the 409 offered in the United States wasn’t available on export models.

As anyone can easily figure out, this Impala comes in very good condition, though it’s not necessarily a perfect 10. The body looks pretty solid, and there’s absolutely no rust damage. Some fixes have already been made, including a new left full quarter.

The interior is the one that requires particular attention, especially if what you’re interested in is a ’61 Impala in tip-top shape. The red interior, however, looks well above the average, so only minor restoration work would be required.

Just as expected, this isn’t the kind of Impala that you can buy with pocket money. This makes perfect sense, especially when taking into account how rare it is, and there’s no doubt its place is in someone’s collection.

The owner is willing to let it go for $65,000, and no other trades are accepted, so if you want to buy the car, you know what you have to do.

Editor's note: This article was not sponsored or supported by a third party.

 
 
 
 
 

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